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 Does cast iron pipelining work well?
Author: Tina1229 (FL)

I don't like to cut the concrete floor in the house. I decide to try the pipelining. Do you know the lining last how many years?

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 Re: Does cast iron pipelining work well?
Author: bernabeu (SC)

It last until fail, or fall, whichever comes later.

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Retired U.A. Local 1 & 638
"Measure Twice & Cut Once"

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 Re: Does cast iron pipelining work well?
Author: hj (AZ)

How LONG it will last is immaterial if you cannot get the interior of the pipe smooth, which can be a problem due to the stalactites and stalagmites which grow in tn the pipes over the years

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 Re: Does cast iron pipelining work well?
Author: Tina1229 (FL)

Do you suggest to do the pipelining?

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 Re: Does cast iron pipelining work well?
Author: bernabeu (SC)

a camera inspection by a QUALIFIED plumber would be the first step

- - - -

Retired U.A. Local 1 & 638
"Measure Twice & Cut Once"

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 Re: Does cast iron pipelining work well?
Author: sum (FL)

I am not a plumber but I had previously considered pipe lining at a property and actually had a pipe lining tech visited on site to do an evaluation and estimate.

I opted not to move forward (actually the tech also advised against it during the visit) because of the following reasons:

(1) Pipe lining requires two points of access to the pipe you are trying to repair. A sleeve is fed between those two points then the sleeve expands outward to hug to the existing pipe wall and hardened to form an epoxy wall inside. This means you cannot really avoid cutting up your floor and slabs unless the section to be lined is completely outdoors. You still have to punch through your slab at those two points and dig down. It's still going to be dusty and messy regardless, just may be to a lesser degree.

(2) If you have cast iron pipes, as hj mentioned, the inner walls of the metal would have corroded over the years and will be bumpy like the inside of a cave instead of a perfectly round circle. The liner would end up assuming these irregularities if they are not "reamed" back to a circular shape. It can be done with a machine fitted with a chain nozzle jet head, then rinsed clean with al debris washed downstream before you do the lining.

(3) If the pipe has collapsed, broken with an offset, or has a belly, you cannot use a liner. Those have to be repaired before the liner is used.

(4) If the liner is sleeved between the two points, there cannot be any joints from additional fixtures in between. If there are branches they will be "sealed" off by the liner, and measure must be taken to cut a hole through the liner from those fixtures. This may not be easy if those fixtures are bath tubs and sinks where access to the pipes are limited or the access is not full size. In addition, elbows may present challenges to using pipe liners.

The tech told me it's more for a straight section, with no branches, between two points, 4" or larger pipes, if it is an existing line with a broken joint or collapsed section, and the pipe has twists and turns, with branches joining in along the way, it's not an ideal solution. That's over ten years ago so perhaps technology has improved, I wouldn't know.

I ended up hiring another company to tunnel below my house to replace 25' of pipes.



Edited 1 times.

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 Re: Does cast iron pipelining work well?
Author: Tina1229 (FL)

Have done the camera inspection. It showed the pipes condition are fare, no damage yet.

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 Re: Does cast iron pipelining work well?
Author: Tina1229 (FL)

How about rerouting the sewer lines to yard?

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 Re: Does cast iron pipelining work well?
Author: sum (FL)

why would you want to reroute your line or replace your line if your line is fine according to your camera inspection.

As to rerouting your line to the yard instead, there are other complications that article you linked failed to mention. That article compared the cost of rerouting vs replacing via a tunnel dig FOR THAT HOUSE. I emphasized "THAT HOUSE" because every job/property is different.

What if your house is on slab? Since you are in Florida I assume you are on slab, and the edges of the slabs sits on concrete footings. To reroute to the outside you need to punch a hole in your concrete footing, what's the cost of that, assuming your city even let you do that. Assuming your city says OK you can cut a hole through that footing and run the pipe outside, it will be a longer reroute back to the main line where it exits the house to tie it back in, the longer run may mean the slope over a long distance is going to be less steep, will that slope work? In addition, is the reroute going to be all grass and easy digging? What it it passes through a thicker concrete driveway or walkway then you are back to demolition. Finally, by rerouting, what are you going to do with the branches of pipes you are picking up along the way? If you take a bathroom and route it outside, what if the existing line picks up a guest bath and a kitchen along the way? Are you going to reroute all of those outside as well?

In my case where I opted to tunnel under the house to replace 25' of existing 3" pipe. I was only 5' from an exterior wall. However, my city did not allow going 5' outside then reroute because I would have to punch through the footing. That said no, and the only option I had was to tunnel under or cut open the slab inside.

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