Welcome to Plbg.com
Thank you to all the plumbing professionals who offer their advice and expertise

Over 700,000 strictly plumbing related posts

Welcome to Plbg.com (also known as PlumbingForum.com) where plumbing advice, education, information, help and suggestions are provided by some of the most experienced plumbers and plumbing contractors anywhere who all wish to "give back" to society. Since 1996 we have been free without popup or other invasive ads and known to be the best online STRICTLY PLUMBING advice site. If you have questions about plumbing, toilets, sinks, faucets, drains, sewers, water filters, venting, water heating, showers, pumps, and other strictly PLUMBING related issues then you've come to the right place. Please refrain from asking or discussing legal questions, or pricing, or where to find and/or purchase products, or any business issues, or for contractor referrals, or any other questions or issues not specifically related to plumbing. Keep all posts positive and absolutely no advertising. Our site is completely free, without ads or pop-ups and we don't tract you. We absolutely do not sell your personal information. We are made possible by:  

Post New
Search
Log In
How to Show Images
Newest Subjects
 Basement toilet overflows in heavy rain
Author: Anonymous User

Yesterday during very heavy rain my basement flooded from water coming out of the toilet. The water was fairly clear and did not smell (there was very minimal solid waste). I called the city and they told me to call them back if it happens again. Apparently they received hundreds of calls that day. One plumbing company I called suggested I may have a partially blocked sewer line? I may have a combination sanitary and storm line.

How can I diagnose and correct the problem? Could the water be my rain water? Could it be the city sewer water? Help! Thanks for your suggestions!



Post Edited (07-07-03 16:34)

Post Reply

 Re: Basement toilet overflows in heavy rain
Author: Wheelchair (IL)

A sewer camera may answer most of your questions. 100 year rains are the ones that cause all of those un-expected problems. The city line can only hold so much water/waste/storm water, before nature kicks in and gravity takes over.
Be glad that it only should happen once every 100 years.
May you live to be a 1000 !

Post Reply

 Re: Basement toilet overflows in heavy rain
Author: plumbhelp (MA)

it could be a blockage. but this is why in the modern age of plumbing systems, there should be a seprate system for storm, and waste water. are u in a big city like boston ma.??? this is common in the downtown areas, because the storm drainage ties into the waste water drainage, and is undersized for heavy rain, and the amount of lines tied into the system over the years.
i would suggest installing a back water valve for this basement bath. it is required in alot of areas. it acts like a check valve, so waste can go out, but it should keep the outher bad stuff from coming back into your home.

good luck.

Post Reply

 Re: Basement toilet overflows in heavy rain
Author: Anonymous User

Maybe it is a partial blockage. I am not sure if my storm drainage ties into the waste water drainage, but the fact that the water coming out was fairly clear and without a smell makes me believe it is a combined system.
If I install this back water valve, I would have to do the same for the laundry drain and the bathroom sink which had some water came up, but did not overflow. Is there another alternative? How about diverting some of the rain water outside and away from the house?

Post Reply

 Re: Basement toilet overflows in heavy rain
Author: plumbhelp (MA)

u would put this backwater valve on the building drain. this is the line that leaves your home, and ties into the city system. if u put this valve in the building drain to your home, it should take care of any backflow trying to get into your home. u will need to pull a permit for this, and should be installed by a licensed plumber. good luck.

Post Reply

 Re: Basement toilet overflows in heavy rain
Author: Anonymous User

If your city had 100's of calls about basement toilets backing up, it's extremely unlikely that all those homeowners had partially obstructed sewer lines. (More likely, it's impossible that so many individuals had the exact same problem in their home systems at the exact same time) Far more likely is that the city sewer system was overloaded by rain pouring into it, and the resultant high pressures caused backups all over. The commonest cause is too much rain water getting into the sewer system. It may have nothing to do with your house. If there is enough fluid getting into the sewer from whatever source, sewers will back up. There are a lot of products for sewer backup prevention at the individual home owner level, but I don't know how effective they are. My own plumber doesn't use any method in his own home, if that's any indication of the value of such systems. My city forbids new construction from allowing storm or sump drainage into the sewers, but most homes in the city are over 30 years old, and the great majority of homes do drain rainwater directly into the sewers through their downspouts and footing drains. My city mandates sump pumps in all new residential housing, and sewer backup prevention valves in all businesses, but not in new residences. If you've followed my discussion, my city's measures do not really address the problem, since most of the older homes are the cause of the problem of the excess demand on the sewers during heavy rains. Some cities do have programs promoting the disconnection of storm drainage from the sewers, no matter what the age of the dwelling.

Post Reply





Please note:
  • Inappropriate messages or blatant advertising will be deleted. We cannot be held responsible for bad or inadequate advice.
  • Plbg.com has no control over external content that may be linked to from messages posted here. Please follow external links with caution.
  • Plbg.com is strictly for the exchange of plumbing related advice and NOT to ask about pricing/costs, nor where to find a product (try Google), nor how to operate or promote a business, nor for ethics (law) and the like questions.
  • Plbg.com is also not a place to ask radiant heating (try HeatingHelp.com), electrical or even general construction type questions. We are exclusively for plumbing questions.

Search for plumbing parts on our sponsor's site:




Special thanks to our sponsor:
PlumbingSupply.com


Copyright© 2024 Plbg.com. All Rights Reserved.