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 Water from washing machine
Author: carols3cats (TX)

Some of the water from my washing machine goes into the sink next to it.
I had someone here who had a balloon type thing at the end of a hose. He connected the hose to the water faucet and put the balloon end in the drain pipe for the washer, and turned the water on high. The water evidentally went down the drain because it did not come up anywhere else. Yet, the washer water continues to come up in the sink. What is going on?

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 Re: Water from washing machine
Author: packy (MA)

maybe you just need to have the drain snaked properly ??

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 Re: Water from washing machine
Author: stuckinlodi (MO)

The balloon thing he used is a device to help clear out a clog in drain pipe. The balloon expands when the water in the attached hose is turned on, it swells to seal off the top of the drain, then it shoots a stream of water into the drain pipe and tries to force the clog to breakup or move into a bigger drain downstream. I suppose these things sometimes work but you need a more thorough cleaning of your drain pipe. The blockage is too far down the pipe or it is too difficult for the balloon method to work.

A washing machine discharges a lot of sudsy water and clothing fibers. Over time the dried suds and fibers can form a blockage. You should probably check into using a lint filter on the end of the washing machine drain hose as it runs into the sink, it will catch a lot of stuff that would be better not going down the drain.

Here are a couple of examples, they are low-cost and easy to install:







Edited 3 times.

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 Re: Water from washing machine
Author: hj (AZ)

Thw "balloon" uses a small jet of water under pressure to "clear" the drain. The washing machine drains a LOT more water in a short period of time, which causes the backup.

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 Re: Water from washing machine
Author: PlumberLoren (CA)

The fibers sometimes referred to as lint really need to be cleared with the proper snake head. If you have PVC or ABS pipes in your drain system they can be washed down to the sewer. If you have a septic Tank it is better to retrieve as much as you can because these fibers do not dissolve. But if you have older cast iron pipe these fibers can cling to imperfections inside the pipe and build up eventually causing a slow drain or even a total stoppage. Good luck.

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 Re: Water from washing machine
Author: packy (MA)

the balloon method can not pressurize the washing machine drain if the drain is connected to an open sink drain.
hence, mechanical snaking is required..

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 Re: Water from washing machine
Author: carols3cats (TX)

The drain hose does not go into the sink. I assume it goes to the main sewer line, as the hose goes into a hole right under the faucets for the washer. There's a metal box there to hold those things. How come most of the water must go down the drain. Only a small amount goes into the sink.
Last night I ran the smallest load available on the washer, and the amount of water in the sink did not even cover the entire bottom of the sink. It is a large type sink one would have in the kitchen if you did not have a double sink. If fI run a half load, I get more water in the sink, but still not near enough to be the amount that was in the washer for the wash and rinse cycles.

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 Re: Water from washing machine
Author: stuckinlodi (MO)

The confusion is because your first post said some of the water from the machine is going into the sink. I think you meant some of the water from your washer is coming up thru the sink drain. Some people have their washing machine drain hose emptying into a nearby sink, it sounded like that was your setup.

That box with the faucets and a hole for the washer drain pipe is connected to a vertical drain pipe under that hole.

Your washing machine water supply lines and drain is probably similar to this photo. You can see that the washer drain hose inserts into the hole in that box behind the washer, the hole has a vertical drain pipe below it. That pipe gets connected eventually to a larger drain pipe. You probably have a partial blockage somewhere in the drain pipe, it is letting some water get by slowly. When the washer empties the water starts backing up and some of it comes up out of the sink drain. The larger the amount of water your washer puts out then the larger the amount of backup. The blockage is probably several feet down the line from the washing machine drain hole, otherwise it would be coming back up out of the hole where the washer drain hose is inserted instead of the nearby sink. You need to have it cleaned by someone that is experienced in drain cleaning.





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