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 Water softener
Author: Nayman's Drain Services (Non-US)

Hey guys,

I read on another forum about water softener resin rejuvenation.
I've never heard of that.

What is the process?

Thanks,
Nayman

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Nayman's Drain Services (Non-US)

NO one have an answer for me?

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 Re: Water softener
Author: hj (AZ)

Never heard of it being done, or anyone doing it. But I cannot imagine it being anything other than a DIY project, given the amount of time it should take.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Wheelchair (IL)

I know of the process being performed by our local Culligan Dealer. The dealer take the old body less head back to the shop and send the unit thru a backwash cycle and induces chemicals into the tank and allows to stand. The unit is then washed and rinsed. The resin level is checked and additional resin is added as needed. Culligan recommends the ReJuv every 5 years and more often depending on the iron in the users water source.

Best Wishes

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Nayman's Drain Services (Non-US)

I installed it about 3 months ago.
I regen every nite, and have good water quality now.

On another site, someone was yakkin about "rejuvenating" the resin, so it would keep working.
I've never heard of that either, so I thought I'd throw it out here.

I mean, resin is resin, and as far as I know, it can't go bad. Or can it?

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Nayman's Drain Services (Non-US)

So Chair, I could take my tank back to Culligan to have it done?
It IS a Culligan. The softener is a used one, given to me by a client not far from me.
Water quality is the same all over town, so the level of resin should not matter.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: hj (AZ)

As far as I know or have heard the only thing that can go bad, is if the resin becomes "honeycombed" so that regeneration does NOT get to all the beads. Then removing it and restoring it to its compacted form should restore it. A bigger problem can be if some resin is washed out with every regeneration so that eventually there is not enough resin left to do the job properly.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: hj (AZ)

Anything with the word "Culligan" in, or on, it is going to be expensive, but the same holds true for words like "Kinetico" and others like that.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: hj (AZ)

Is this process less expensive than buying a new softener that is not called "Culligan"?

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Nayman's Drain Services (Non-US)

good question.
Answer, anyone?

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Wheelchair (IL)

If the unit was used, the exact condition of the resin bed is unknown. Rejuv'ing the unit includes the scrub and clean process that restore the resin bed to like new. Last one cost me a large buck n quarter. Cheaper then a new one, with a warranty too.

Call your local Culligan Dealer and ask for their Rejuve Schedule and cost.
Best Wishes

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 Re: Water softener
Author: waukeshaplumbing (WI)

you save a couple hundred, but the rest of the WS is still old....just buy a new softener..seems silly to rejuvenate something that is $400-500

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 Re: Water softener
Author: CHayn (IL)

My shop purchased a water softener company last year. I was given the task of moving the resin wash station to our shop. It is a large tank (Like a horse trough) with a smaller, yet still quite large bowl type vessel inside of it. The smaller one has a water line that runs into the bottom of it. they take old softners they have removed and dump the resin from them into the smaller tank. turn the water on and let it run for a while and overflow the smaller vessel. If I understand correctly, the bad resin washes over the top and the good resin stays in the smaller tank. They can then use that resin in rebuilt or rental unit softeners.
I am not positive that is the whole process but I can ask one of the softener guys and get back to you. Does it save money?? I dont have a clue.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: CHayn (IL)

After reading the posts again are you talking about regeneration? Your softener regens every night? You must go through a LOT of salt. Even in bad water areas you should only need to regen every 700-800 gallons of water usage.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Wheelchair (IL)

Cylinder Rejuve, is much different the Rejeneration. The cylinder is chemically scrubbed and rinse in a fashion, under pressure, to renew the resin bed. It takes several hours and with the proper equipment, several cylinders can be done at one time.

Best Wishes

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Nayman's Drain Services (Non-US)

CHain?

As a matter of fact, I don't.
I put in 200lbs to start with, cuz I didn't know what to expect, but I'm willing to bet I have well over 175 left in the tank.
I check for bridging at least once a week, and stir the salt to make sure.
The water level sits about 4 inches above the salt, so no worries there.
My OL loves the soft water, on account it "does wonders for her hair"
Soap usage is down somewhat(laundry, showers, shampoo, dishwasher)

If you could ask your WS guys, I would be interested.
THX
N



Edited 1 times.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Nayman's Drain Services (Non-US)

Waukesha,

my client paid me $200 to take it out of her house, and a $50 dump fee.
She in actuality paid me to take it home, and use it. She didn't like the feel of the water.
So, what in effect you are telling me, is to spend the coin she paid me to get rid of it, and buy a new WS. IF what CHain says is right, I'll spend about $150 for a "rejuv"
I think I'll still be a hundred ahead.

I get maybe 5 or 6 of these a year.
People move into town, don't like the WS system, and don't know how to get rid of them.
A few of my friends now have the saystems, and all it costs them is the parts for install, and cut-rate labor.
Seems like a win-win situation to me.
So why would I want to spend 4-500 for a new unit?

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 Re: Water softener
Author: GSchreiber, CWS VI (MN)

Save yourself a lot of time and money. Call the Culligan Man and have them make a serice call to check your unit. Ask them the questions you ask here.

I used to work for Culligan International and in the Culligan System for 22 years. I never heard of a "Rejuvenation process". In fact, I have a Culligan unit still working just fine in my current home and the softener is over 22 years old.

Some Water Dealers that rent softeners will, when their Customer moves, bring the unit back to the Dealership and get it ready to put out on rental again. They clean the entire system thoroughly. They add any resin that is needed. They replace the resin if it needs replacement. Some may call than "rejuvenation". However, I have never heard of a "every 5 year rejuvenation" of a softener on a routine basis.

I was employed by my present employer, an Ion Exchange Resin manufacturer, who made me an offer I could not refuse. I left Culligan amicably. I still feel they are a top notch organization. I am a Certified Water Specialist and many of my Customers are Culligan Dealers.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Nayman's Drain Services (Non-US)

Mr. Schreiber,

I'll be on the honker on Monday morning talking to the Culligan Man.
I thought, since I'm in this forum. to throw the question out there
for my compadres.
In past threads I've said that I'm willing to learn, and I'll stick to that.

Thanks to all that had an opinion to share, I'll let you know what happens.

Be safe, all of you.

Nayman

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Wheelchair (IL)

And I hope you keep those used units as they rarely wear out if properly maintained.
Best Wishes

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 Re: Water softener
Author: hj (AZ)

Especially if it is old enough to still have a mechanical timer/control unit.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: hj (AZ)

I don't know how the good and bad resins are smart enough to separate themselves.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: hj (AZ)

You DON'T, unless you will spend $350.00 or so to rejuvenate an old softener. But I guess a related question would be, "why rejuvenate the resin, rather than replace it with new resin?"



Edited 2 times.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: GSchreiber, CWS VI (MN)

hj,

In that process the "bad resin" is broken resin beads. In our industry we call them resin fines. They backwash out. The "good resin" are the beads that are not broken. Once all the fines have been removed then they can add back the correct amount of good new or used resin.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Nayman's Drain Services (Non-US)

mine has the mechanical timer on it.
Some I get have electronic, some don't.
All I know is, I get paid to take them away, and people that want one and have let me know, get one.

Seems like a great deal for recycling the units. They don't wind up in the landfill, so everyone is happy

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Wheelchair (IL)

Nayman, you are a credit to plumbing.... and not a debit !

Best Wishes

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 Re: Water softener
Author: Nayman's Drain Services (Non-US)

thank you.
I take this as a compliment, since I'm not a plumber.
Most of what I do is minor emergency repairs, and a lot of S**t disturbing.
Clogged drains are my specialty.

Have a wonderful weekend, you just made mine

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 Re: Water softener
Author: hj (AZ)

Most "fines" are backwashed out during the initial installation of the softener, and any later ones can get through the screens. My question was in reference to the statement that the "bad" resin floats to the top and washes away. Unless the fines change their specific gravity, I do not think they can suddenly become buoyant.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: GSchreiber, CWS VI (MN)

They don't become buoyant but the are lighter in weight than the unbroken beads and therefore do backwash out. Every water softener that is in use has as the first part of the regeneration cycle a "backwash". That removes any dirt accumulated and any resin fines. Sometimes the softener does not remove all of the fines and they accumulate to reduce/restrict flow. Sometimes the backwash flow control gets clogged and reduces the backwash to a rate which does not allow the fines to be removed. After backwashing the resin fines will be at the top of the resin bed in the softener because, again, they are lighter in weight than the unbroken beads.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: CHayn (IL)

They still make the ones with the mechanical head. I believe you are talking about a Flek head. The Kenmores and WaterBoss units are JUNK! Give me a Flek head every time.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: LemonPlumber (FL)

If you could teach them to count !!!GREAT.undue ph by miss adjustment kills.my love/copper\.I would rather it stopped working than ran the ph high because it worked well.as set.To often, over softened water is bad .I would pitty the man who thought perfect water is a myth.

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 Re: Water softener
Author: GPBobby (ID)

The resin particles do not need to change their specific gravity in order to become buoyant. The effect taking place here is suspension, the same forces that make (non-polluted) river water cloudy. Those particles you know as silt and stay in suspension as long as the water is in agitation. They eventually settle out, heaviest ones first, to form river deltas.

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